English 1213 Sections 006, 010, and 011, Fall 2005

  The Interactive Course Syllabus    
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Research, Documentation, MLA Style and Argumentative Essays:
An Introduction to Writing College Level Argumentative Research Papers

Instructor: John Richard Stevens        Office: Morrill Hall room 408    Office Phone:  744-2079

Office hours:  Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., Wednesdays from 10:45 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Fridays from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. My mailbox is located in 205 Morrill Hall.

E-mail:  You may contact me anytime at: stevens at englishdiscourse.org


Course Time and Place:
Section 006: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from   9:30 a.m to 10:20 a.m., Morrill Hall, Room 212
Section 010: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 12:30 p.m to 1:20 p.m., Gunderson, Room 105
Section 011: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from   1:30 p.m to 2:20 p.m., Morrill Hall, Room 212


The Most Important Skills You Must Learn in Composition II:

1. How to use textual analysis to write more focused arguments.
2. How to research your papers and use MLA documentation style guidelines.



Important Note Regarding This Syllabus: It is your best resource, so refer to it early and often throughout the semester.  On the first day of class I give a brief but informative lecture focusing on the major items of importance in this document, and I allow time for a question and answer period.  But even so, I expect you to read this syllabus on your own, more than once, in its entirety, and ask me any/all pertinent questions and points of concern.  It is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with all the policies noted herein and effectively negotiate them. Still, I want to make clear that I am available to help you with everything related to this course. If you have questions or concerns I want you to speak with me.  Students who miss the first day of class should make an extra effort to read this document thoroughly and see me during office hours with any questions.


Surf the Syllabus by Choosing a Subject Heading


Subject Headings A through L
Subject Headings M through Z

The Major Projects: Prompts and Guidelines
Choose and View a Week from the Schedule of Activities:


Web Resources:

My own webpage: www.englishdiscourse.org
Composition home page: http://comp.okstate.edu
MLA guide: http://www.mla.org

OSU Resources: The Writing Center is located in Morrill Hall, room 104. Consultants will assist you with the current draft of your essay. Go To The Writing Center's Home Page.


Grading Scale:
900 points and above = A
800 - 899 points = B
700 - 799 points = C
600 - 699 points = D
599 points and below = F
  
The Final Course Grade Is Not Rounded Up.

Course Components and their Percentages of the Final Course Grade:

  150 points   Essay 2 -- Connections Essay -- Page count requirements: 4 full pages minimum to 5 full pages maximum, plus a works cited page. Due date: 9/16/05
  100 points   Project 3A Annotated bibliography  Due date: 10/14/05
  150 points   Bibliographical Analysis Essay --  Page count requirements: 6 full pages minimum to 7 full pages maximum, plus a works cited page. Due date: 11/4/05
   50 points    Moveable Bridge Essay --   Page count requirements: 4 full pages minimum to 5 full pages maximum, plus a works cited page.Due date: 11/18/05
  250 points   Essay 4 --   Argumentative Essay  Page count requirements: 9 full pages minimum to 10 full pages maximum, plus a works cited page.  Due date: 12/2/05
   50 points   Essay 5 (final examination):  (participation is mandatory)
  80 points   Reading Responses: (There are a total of 4 RRs, worth 20 points each) See Reading Responses General Guidelines, and Reading Response Instructions.
   40 points   Team Debate Project  Due date: 10/19/05 and 10/21/05 as assigned.
   30 points   Individual Project  Due date: Approximately 11/7/05 through 11/16/05 as assigned.
   100 points   Participation  (also see missing and late work)



Course summary and objectives:

The following are all key to earning a passing grade:

This is a writing class and the draft and revise writing process is a key element.  Accordingly, my expectations are that you will begin writing and revising all major projects early and often, and also participate in all peer revision workshops. Composition II progresses from the skills developed in Composition I.  That is, your writings are required to include:

1) A thesis statement in the introductory paragraph.
2) Focused body paragraphs that advance the thesis statement.
3) A concluding paragraph that ties together your thesis with key points from the opening paragraph and from the body paragraphs. Moreover, your concluding paragraph should make an intellectual conclusion, which might be a solution to the focused problem or issue that you have been arguing about, or some further assertion based upon the evidence presented in your paper.

This course will also teach you new skills.  You will learn the basics of MLA documentation style guidelines, and you will learn library research techniques.  In effect, you will advance the Composition I skills of writing an argumentative paper, but further, you will learn how to write an argumentative research paper. Moreover, I will teach you how to compose a polished and professional college level paper: this is the OSU course that teaches you how to research and format a paper for upper division classes.

You must be clear about the fact that all Composition II courses require that students spend some hours in the library doing research.  Composition II is a writing class, but it is also a writing class that is research driven.

It is also my expectation that, as the semester evolves, you will become more astute readers, and more highly skilled writers of academic prose. Along those lines, I expect your writing skills and your analytical skills to progress from one major project to the next.  I will assist you in identifying your writing strengths, as well as the aspects of your writing that will negatively impact your grade in this class and in upper division classes.  No student is expected to completely resolve every lesser strength associated with their writing, but you are expected to focus on these issues and demonstrate progress in resolving them. See the  grading rubric on my webpage for more information on the criteria I use to grade your writings.



Here is the Most Important Definition You Will Learn This Semester:

  • Definition of a thesis statement: A DEBATABLE POINT.


    Some Basic Information About This Course:

  • I will teach you to advance your skills in textual analysis, research, and writing arguments. And I wish to make clear that all your writings must include a thesis statement. A thesis statement is a debatable point. Although you learned how to write thesis statements in Composition I, we will spend class time reviewing how to write thesis statements.

  • Follow The 5 Paragraph Essay Format for all your Reading Responses. Reading Responses that do not follow The 5 Paragraph Essay Format will receive a less than adequate grade. I will teach you how to use this format from day one.

    Provisional Syllabus: As the semester evolves, so will this syllabus.  As such, scheduled in class activities may change. Moreover, even if we have departed from syllabus-scheduled activities at times, there is no reason for you to assume that any scheduled work has been cancelled or changed if I have made no such announcement.

    Required Texts:
    1. Speculations (Landrum, et al.)
    2. A Pocket Style Manual, 4th edition (Hacker)
    3. Writing Worth Reading, OSU edition (Huddleston, et al.)

    Other Required Materials:

    Three pocket folders and some floppy diskettes:

    First pocket folder--The five major projects must be turned in for grading in a pocket folder with all drafts.

    Second pocket folder--contains your syllabus and all the class handouts. This second pocket folder should be brought to every class.

    Third pocket folder--contains all work returned to you, so that you have an ongoing record of all your graded assignments.  By keeping your graded assignments organized you will be able to calculate your own grade at any given point in the semester. I will not calculate your grade until after the final examination.

    Floppy diskette--make backup copies of all your final work and your work in progress, so as to avoid lost work through computer related problems.

    Further Requirements:

    If absent, you should communicate with peers regarding missed work, or schedule an appointment with me. I will not update you by E-mail if you have missed a class.

    Turn off pagers and cell phones.  Don't read outside material in class.  Don't bring food into class.

    E-mail Guidelines:

    Be professional in your E-mails to me and to your peers. Treat these as though they are business correspondences. Make them brief.  Ask your question and I will provide the necessary information. Always sign both your first and last name. Always use a subject heading that includes this course number and its section number. Finally, use E-mail judiciously, yet understand that these policies are not an effort to discourage your questions. I am available to answer your questions via E-mail, office hours, and during class.

    Missing the First Day of Class:

    If you were part of my original class roster, in other words if you were enrolled in this class from the first day of the semester or earlier, but simply did not attend the first day of class, then all missed work is already considered late.  Review the policy on
    late work.  However, certain assignments require a draft and revise process. This means that you turn in the assignment, I grade it and return it to you, and you generate a revision based on my comments. If you join class so late that it makes impossible the draft and revise process, then some of your missed work will be graded as zero. It is your responsibility to speak to me about missed work, so that I can communicate to you exactly what work you must turn in. You should factor these policies into your decision to remain in this class.

    Transfer students:

    If you transfer into this class, then immediately turn in to me all writing from the former class.  In the event that you have no work to turn in, or if I consider the work to be insufficient, then all of the missed work for this class must be made up and is due on the next class. However, certain assignments require a draft and revise process. This means that you turn in the assignment, I grade it and return it to you, and you generate a revision based on my comments. If you join class so late that it makes impossible the draft and revise process, then some of your missed work will be graded as zero. It is your responsibility to speak to me about missed work, so that I can communicate to you exactly what work you must turn in. You should factor these policies into your decision to remain in this class.

    You must also provide me with the section number of that former class and that instructor's name. Attendance from the former class will be applied to this class.

    Late registration students:

    All missed work must be made up, and is due on the next class. However, certain assignments require a draft and revise process. This means that you turn in the assignment, I grade it and return it to you, and you generate a revision based on my comments. If you join class so late that it makes impossible the draft and revise process, then some of your missed work will be graded as zero. It is your responsibility to speak to me about missed work, so that I can communicate to you exactly what work you must turn in. You should factor these policies into your decision to remain in this class.

    Further, you should communicate with your peers about missed lecture materials, E-mails, etc., or see me during office hours.

    Late work:

      The First Thing You Need to Know is:
  • After the class period ends the work is late.
      Below I List Policies for Turning in Late Major Projects, and all other course work:
    Turning in Late Major Projects:
  • The Major Projects, meaning Essay 2, Project 3, the Moveable Bridge Essay, and Essay 4, lose 5% per calendar day, including weekends, holidays, breaks, etc.
  • Late Major Projects must be turned in, no matter how late, or you cannot pass this course. Failing to turn in a major project constitutes automatic failure of this course  (per OSU Composition Program Guidelines).

    All Other Course Work:

  • A loss of 5% per calendar day late, including weekends, breaks, holidays, etc.
      A Final Word About Late Work and Missing Work:
  • Late or Missing work of any kind will have an effect on your Participation grade, perhaps to the point of zero in that component of the course. So when you fail to turn in assignments on time, or need Writing Center consultations to make up for non-participation in peer revision workshops, not only do you lose credit for that particular assignment, but you will lose points in your Participation grade as well. If you are not handing in written assignments on time, or keeping up with the course work then I assume you are not doing the assigned reading, or at least you are not adequately analyzing the reading; if your analysis is inadequate then you are not prepared to participate in class and groupwork discussions. Do the coursework as it is assigned, do it to the best of your abilities, and turn it in on time if you expect to pass this course.

    Being Prepared for Class:

    Many of the assignments for this class necessitate the use of my own website and other websites as well. We are all aware that websites experience technical difficulties and become temporarily unavailable from time to time.   I strongly suggest that you read ahead on your syllabus, access all upcoming materials and print them at least a week in advance.  Computer or website related problems are not a valid excuse for the late turn-in of an assignment, nor is it a valid excuse for being unprepared for class.  It is solely your responsibility to make certain that all work is turned in on time and you are prepared for class.

    Problems With My Website:

    Some browsers are designed to cache web pages, which means you may be viewing an old version of a web page. If I have announced an update to my website, yet when you view the page the new information does not appear, then do the following: hold down your F5 key for a full five seconds without letting up. The webpage should update and you will be able to access the new material, or whatever information you were attempting to find

    Computer Labs:

    What do you do if your computer or Internet connection goes down?

    All students have access to computer labs on campus.  You will need your student id card to get in and out of the labs in addition to your master password for the novell system.  Most of the labs should have someone on duty to help you find this password, or you may go to the site http://home.okstate.edu/prism to learn your password.  If you encounter difficulties with the prism website, you can call tech support at 744-7836. The printing in each of these labs is free.  Three of the labs are 24 hours: Bennett Hall, Willham Mezzanine, Math Sciences Lab 108 (periodically reserved between 8am-6pm).  Student Union 065 is open M-F 8am-10pm and Sa-Su Noon-5pm.  Business Building 002 (periodically reserved) is open M-Th 8:30am-11:45pm, F 8:30am-4:45pm, Sa Noon-4:45pm, Su Noon-11:45pm.  Classroom Building 4th Floor (periodically reserved) is open M-F 8am-5pm.  Sparc Lab Engineering South 113 is open during Engineering South hours of operation. The OSU Writing Center in Morrill Hall 104 is the only facility that charges for printing, 25 cents per page. Further, to the best of my knowledge the hours of operation listed above are accurate. However, it is your responsibility to verify this information and be prepared in advance to use these labs.

    Formatting of All Course Work:

    All course work, with the exception of in-class writings, must be typed.  If you turn in handwritten work it will be calculated as a zero.

    All course work must be in a 12 point Times New Roman font.  Other fonts, particularly those generating a deceptively higher page count, are unacceptable, and such papers will receive a lower grade.

    Margins are to be either 1 inch or 1¼ inches.

    Always double space.  Do not turn in any typewritten single spaced work or I will reduce the grade by a minimum of one full letter grade.

    Every major project and Reading Response you hand in must be titled, and the title must include a colon. We will discuss this further in class. See the title of this course as an example. Writings that do not follow this guideline will receive a 5 point grade reduction.

    Never use subject headings in your writings. I will give specific examples of subject headings during class. I will reduce the grade of any assignment by 2 points per subject heading used.

    Adhere to the page count guidelines for all assignments.  See the subject heading: Page Count Requirements for: Major Projects; Peer Revision Workshop Drafts; All Course Work, listed below.

    If any of the above problems persist, I will grade the assignment as a zero.

    Major projects:

    There are five major projects in this course, four essays and an annotated bibliography. OSU Composition Program guidelines mandate that no student can pass this course unless all of the major projects are handed in.  Even if the project is so late that it requires a grade of zero to be given, the project must still be handed in and the page count must adhere to the guidelines on this syllabus, as well as other guidelines established via handouts/E-mails/lectures.  Failure to hand in a major project constitutes automatic failure of this course.  No exceptions, regardless of circumstances. You should also review the information listed below under Grading of Your Major Projects and Peer Revision Workshops.

    Grading of Your Major Projects:

    Your paper will not be graded, nor will it be considered as turned in, unless it is accompanied by all the drafts that lead up to it, as well as copies of all secondary resources cited in your paper.  This means you must turn in all your in-class writings as well as your out of class writings. Until I, and peer reviewers, have read and commented on an intermediate drafts of the paper  (one that ts typed and meet the assignment requirements as to subject, approach, formatting, and length) and you have revised in accordance with those comments, you cannot turn in a final copy for grading.

    Once your research topic has been approved and you begin your annotated bibliography project you will be writing about that topic for the remainder of the semester. Understand that each major project is a completely new essay, which means that I expect new writing. You will have weeks to work on each major project, and these are not cut and paste assignments. Do not make the mistake of including writing from a previous major project, or it may result in a grade as low as zero.

    Even if I have read and commented on a paper copy or an E-mailed draft of your paper, but you have participated in none of the peer revision workshops for that paper, you cannot turn in a final copy for grading.  Your only recourse is to schedule at least one consultation at the writing center. One consultation makes up for one missed peer revision workshop. That consultation must take place in-person: E-mail consultations do not count as make-up for a missed peer revision workshop.  The writing center must also E-mail me verification of your consultation.  Only then may you hand in a final copy for grading.  A late major project will also result in a reduction of your Participation grade, perhaps to the point of zero in that component of the course. Also, make certain you are familiar with the information contained below under the subject heading Peer Revision Workshops.

    Peer Revision Workshops:

    Peer Revision Workshops are crucial to the draft and revise writing process taught in this course, and you are expected to participate in all of them. I will reduce the final grade of an essay by 5% if a peer review workshop is missed for any reason, including absence from class. Remember, if you have failed to participate in all of the peer revision workshops for a major project, you cannot turn in a final copy for grading.  Also see the subject heading Grading of Your Major Projects for more information.  Further, even if one or more of the peer revision workshops has been cancelled or rescheduled, and you have participated in none of the peer revision workshops, you cannot turn in a final copy for grading. You should also review the information under the subject heading Major Projects. This means you must participate in all peer revision workshops.
    Page Count Requirements for: Major Projects; Peer Revision Workshop Drafts; All Course Work:

    My instructions for page count requirements are unmistakably clear; on any given assignment I tell you the minimum full page count required to the maximum full page count required.  Assignments that do not meet these requirements receive a lower grade, perhaps to the point of zero.   Also, see formatting requirements. For peer revision workshops: if your paper falls even slightly short of the minimum page count, even if only by a line or two of text, you will not receive credit for participation in that workshop.

    Asking the Instructor to Review Drafts of your Major Projects:

    Although I will review the drafts of your papers during peer revision workshops, if you feel that you need some extra assistance I am available.  You may schedule an appointment during my office hours, or you may walk in without an appointment.

    Research Proposal:

    Students will turn in a short proposal, no more than a paragraph, about the topic they have chosen for their annotated bibliography. If you wish to change topics for the annotated bibliography or any subsequent project, then you must submit a new proposal. Your research topic must be approved before you can begin doing research, or it will negatively impact your grade. You may also wish to review section one of the Project 3 Prompt and Guidelines. Some of the topics that I will not approve are genetic research, gene patenting, gun control, abortion, anorexia, bulimia, euthanasia, the death penalty, postpartum depression, the dust bowl, smoking, the Great Plains, xenotransplantation, blood-doping or steroids etc. in sports, stem cell research, obesity, deforestation, postpartum depression, cloning, animal rights, experimentation on animals, free Internet downloads, copyright issues.

    Avoiding the Use of Gender-specific Language:

    Do not use discriminatory words such as man and mankind.  Use non-gender-specific language like humankind, humanity, and people.  For each instance of gender-specific language in your writings one percentage point will be deducted from that assignment's grade. Further, do not use discriminatory language of any type. For each instance of discriminatory language in your writings one percentage point will be deducted from that assignment's grade.

    Student/Teacher Conferences: On one or more occasions, I may schedule individual student/teacher conferences at my office, in which case a class period will be canceled.  All students are required to participate by scheduling an appointment. You are expected to bring with you two copies of the most current draft of the Major Project you are working on. I will reduce the final grade of your essay by 5% if a conference is missed for any reason.   There is no way to make up these points.  Further, I will not reschedule appointments: if you miss it or if you are unprepared for it, you will not receive credit.

    Academic dishonesty:

    According to University Policy, plagiarism is "The representation of someone else's ideas as if they are one's own. Where the arguments, data, designs, etc., of someone else are being used in a paper, report, oral presentation, or similar academic project, this fact must be made explicitly clear by citing the appropriate references. The references must fully indicate the extent to which any parts of the project are not one's own work." Plagiarism can result in reduction of the grade, failure of the course, or expulsion from the University. For more information, see the policies listed at comp.okstate.edu.

    Absences Policy Attendance/Participation Grading:

    Per Composition Program policy:

    6 absences carry no automatic grade reduction. 7 absences result in a 5% reduction of the final course grade. 8 absences result in a 10% reduction of the final course grade. 9 absences result in a 15% reduction of the final course grade. 10 absences result in automatic failure of this course.

    However, there are variables that affect this guideline, which are explained below:

    Participation Grading:

    Your Participation grade is determined by the following factors: how much you participate in discussions, and the careful thinking demonstrated by your remarks.  There are also other variables involved that will negatively affect your grade, which include the following: late work; missing work; unsatisfactory in-class work; lack of preparation, which means failure to be prepared for peer revision workshops and/or other activities; unprofessional conduct; and your failure to meet the requirements of this syllabus.   Moreover, I expect you to participate in every class by significantly adding to class discussions, which means group discussions, as well as the discussions led by me.  I expect your reading, writing, analyses, and discussion to reflect careful thought and preparation.  Considering these policies, if you are absent  six or less times but you create a situation that negatively affects your grade, you will receive a grade that is lower than 100, perhaps to the point of zero in this component of the course.

    Other points worth noting:

    1) Arrival after your name has been called for attendance is a tardy; three times tardy equals a charged absence; 5 minutes late is a charged absence; leaving class early is a charged absence.

    2) If you inform me of a past or future absence I will merely acknowledge that you have communicated with me on the matter.  Such acknowledgements on my part do not excuse the absence.  You are either present in class or not, and I make an attendance record of the situation you create.  The only exceptions are for University Excused Absences.

    Discussion Questions/Observations:

    There are no direct points earned from turning in discussion questions. Still, these are assignments, so failure to participate by turning them in on time will result in a reduction of your participation grade. As with all course work, the guidelines for late work and missing work apply.

    Missing Class and How to Find Out What You Missed:

    If you miss a class, or classes, I cannot update you by E-mail with regard to missed lectures and/or assignments. Rather, schedule an appointment and/or consult with your peers.

    Turning in work:

    I will not ask for work that is due.  You  are responsible for handing in all assignments at the end of class, leaving it in one pile on the student desk nearest to the classroom door.

    Turning in work by E-mail: 

    Only the course work I specify may be turned in by E-mail. If I make exceptions to this rule for specific assignments, it does not establish precedent. Under no circumstances may Major Projects be turned in by E-mail.

    Do not leave assignment turn-ins or notes on my desk in 408 Morrill Hall. If for some reason you cannot turn in the work during class, then leave it in my mailbox in 205 Morrill Hall. Being in college and being a professional means being prepared for class.

    Proofreading and Editing:

    Students are expected to hand in work that is not riddled with sentence level errors. Papers show a lack of proofreading and editing when they contain a preponderance of errors: extra words, missing words, poor punctuation, spelling errors, the incorrect use of the singular or plural, slang, colloquialisms, improper or insufficient use of paragraphs, and improper MLA citation style.  Such papers will receive a lower grade.

    Final Examination:

    Participation is mandatory.  There are no make-ups or retakes of the final examination.  Of course, if you do not take the final examination you will receive a zero on the final, but there will also be an additional reduction of at least fifty points from your participation grade. In some cases you may lose all participation points. For example, a student who has earned 940 points (an "A") prior to the final exam, and then does not participate in the final exam will then have 890 points or less, which is a "B."

    Reading Responses (general information):

    Readings will be derived from our primary text for this course, Speculations, but we will read from other sources as well: handouts; hypertext readings on the Internet; readings on reserve at the library, and other sources as well. A reading response, hereafter referred to as RR, is due for each one. RR's are due on the discussion day, which is always the class period that follows the assigned date of the reading.

    Reading Response Instructions (instructions for how to write them):

    A RR is a mini-essay, or a mini-paper. It is a 4 or 5 paragraph essay that is a minimum of 1½ pages to a maximum of 2 pages, plus a third page which is a works cited page in accordance with MLA style guidelines. RR's must also include appropriate in-text citations in accordance with MLA style guidelines. Follow The 5 paragraph Essay Format for all your RRs. We will discuss this handout at length throughout the semester.



    Team Debate Project:

    This assignment is worth a total of 40 potential points. Review the Team Debate Project Prompt and Guidelines.

    Individual Project:

    This assignment is worth a total of 30 potential points. Review the Individual Project Prompt and Guidelines.

    University excused absences:

    If you have a university excused absence and I receive official notification in the form of an E-mail from the proper OSU official, then you will not incur a charged absence.  However, a university excused absence does not excuse you from any coursework except in-class quizzes (more on this in the following paragraph). Make certain that all work is turned in by the due date; if this means that you must turn in the work early, then it is up to you to do so or my policies on late work will apply.  In cases when a university excused absence coincides with a peer revision workshop, then you must turn in the draft early, or my grade reduction policies listed under peer revision workshops will apply.

    When University excused absences coincide with an in-class quiz, then I would presumably receive written documentation of the exemption from class, by E-mail, from the proper OSU official.  In such cases the quiz will be treated as a "pass."  In effect, it will not be factored into your final course grade.  University excused absences do not excuse students from online quizzes.  It is your responsibility to find out whether an online quiz has been assigned during your absence; it must be handed in during the second class meeting not covered by your university excused absence. If you are not certain that you understand this policy, ask me.

    When University excused absences coincide with in-class writings, then I would also presumably receive written documentation of the exemption from class, by E-mail, from the proper OSU official.  In such cases the in-class writing must be made up and handed in on the second class meeting not covered by your university excused absence.  University excused absences do not excuse students from in-class writing.  It is your responsibility to find out what has transpired in class during your absence, and what work needs to be made up. If you are not certain that you understand this policy, ask me.

    Add/Drop Information:

    8/29/05: Last day to add a course (nonrestrictive). Last day to drop with no grade and no fees.
    9/2/05: Last day to add a course (restrictive: requires instructor's signature). Last day to drop with 50% fees.
    11/11/05: Last day to drop a course (grade of W): drop by petition only after this date. Last day to withdraw from all courses with automatic grade of W.
    12/2/05: Last day to withdraw from all courses with assigned grade of W or F

    Students with Disabilities: If you believe you have a disability that may affect your performance in the course, have Student Disability Services contact your instructor who will work with that office to implement any necessary accommodations. SDS is located in 315 Student Union (744-7116)


    THE WEEKLY SCHEDULE:

    WEEK ONE:

    M 8-22:
    Today's class consists mainly of an introduction to the course.

  • Homework:

  • Follow these instructions, labeled 1 to 3:

    1) Click on the following active links, print the handouts, and bring them to Wednesday's class along with your Speculations book:

    The 5 Paragraph Essay Format
    Essay 2 Prompt and Guidelines

    2) Go to the bookstore in the Student Union and buy the Required Texts.

    3) RR 1 on Lessig's "Privacy as Property" in your Speculations book. Structure this and all RRs in accordance with The 5 Paragraph Essay Format.

    If you have any difficulty whatsoever accessing these materials, E-mail me immediately!

    W 8-24:
    TODAY'S CLASS: RR 1 on Lessig due. Bring to class today: your Speculations book and all the material you printed from my webpage. Today we will discuss Essay 2; read part of the Lessig reading in Speculations; discuss various aspects of arguments.

  • Homework:
  • Read pp. 44-63 in Writing Worth Reading, and be prepared for a class discussion of those pages on Friday.

    F 8-26:
    TODAY'S CLASS: Bring to class today: your Writing Worth Reading book and your Speculations book. Discussion of Writing Worth Reading pp. 44-63; 35 minute in-class writing on Essay 2.


    WEEK TWO:  

    M 8-29:
    TODAY'S CLASS: Bring to class today: your Speculations book. Discussion of Lessig article; MLA Style Guidelines. Last day to add a course (nonrestrictive). Last day to drop with no grade and no fees.

  • Homework:
  • RR 2 on Lessig. Yes, RR 2 is on the very same Lessig reading as RR 1. Here is how this homework assignment works: today during class I handed back your RR 1 on Lessig. You will revise that RR 1 based on my comments and turn in the revision during Wednesday's class. That revision is your RR 2. TIP: For RR 2, focus much attention on strengthening your thesis statement and then revise the body paragraphs to demonstrate a clear connection to your thesis.

    W 8-31: TODAY'S CLASS: RR 2 on Lessig due.  MLA Style Guidelines; discuss essay 2 questions/concerns.

    F 9-2: TODAY'S CLASS: Bring to class today your Speculations book and your A Pocket Style Manual book (from here forward, bring your A Pocket Style Manual book to every class); MLA Style Guidelines lecture; discuss Essay 2 questions/concerns; basics of the research process and how/where to locate scholarly articles for Essay 2; Click here, print the handout How to Use EZ Proxy, and bring it to class today. Your Research Proposal is due on Wednesday 9/14/05. Follow the link and review the guidelines before choosing a topic. Last day to add a course (restrictive: requires instructor's signature). Last day to drop with 50% fees.

  • Homework:
  • Go to the library and locate one secondary source, meaning a book or an article, that relates to the subject of your Essay 2. You will use this secondary source as supporting evidence in Essay 2.  Bring to Wednesday's class the secondary source and all of your previous Essay 2 writings. Click here read the Brendan I. Koerner article, "Rise of the Green Machine," print it and bring a copy to class on Wednesday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.


    WEEK THREE:  

    M 9-5  UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY

    W 9-7 TODAY'S CLASS: In class writing on Essay 2. You may also show me the article you will use as your secondary resource for Essay 2. Discussion of Koerner article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

  • Homework:
  • Read pp. 335-358 in Writing Worth Reading" and be prepared for a class discussion on Friday. Your Research Proposal is due on Wednesday 9/14/05. Follow the link and review the guidelines before choosing a topic.

    F 9-9:
    TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of pp. 335-358, Writing Worth Reading. MLA Style Guidelines lecture.


    WEEK FOUR: 

    M 9-12  TODAY'S CLASS:  Peer Revision Workshop for Essay 2, four full pages minimum, bring several copies. Click here print the Peer Revision Worksheet for Essays, and bring a copy to class today.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Associated Press article, "Toll Roads Tackle Traffic," print it and bring a copy to class on Wednesday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    W 9-14  TODAY'S CLASS: Research Proposal Due. Discussion of Associated Press article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

  • Homework:
  • Click here print the Project 3 Guidelines, and bring a copy to class on Friday.

    F 9-16:  TODAY'S CLASS Essay 2 due. MLA Style Guidelines lecture; we will spend some time discussing Project 3 and its relationship to all remaining major projects. Click here print the Project 3 Guidelines, and bring a copy to class today.

  • Homework:
  • RR 3 on Hylton.


    WEEK FIVE: 
    M 9-19  TODAY'S CLASS:  RR 3 on Hylton due. Discussion of Hylton article.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Amit Asaravala article, "Nice Ride: The Hydrogen Gremlin," print it and bring a copy to class on Wednesday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    W 9-21  TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of Asaravala article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

    F 9-23:TODAY'S CLASS: Peer revision workshop for annotated bibliography.  Bring to class 4 articles along with completed citations/annotations for all four. 50 words minimum for each annotation.  Bring several copies of each citation/annotation.  Remember that in the final version of your annotated bibliography the annotations must be longer. Click here print the Peer Revision Worksheet for Annotated Bibliography, and bring a copy to class today.In class writing on annotations; short individual conferences on your annotated bibliography project. I will also assign the teams for the Team Debate Project.


    WEEK SIX:

    M 9-26  TODAY'S CLASS: Today we will not meet in our regular classroom, but rather at the Edmon Low Library. We will meet on the second floor, which is the reference area. When you arrive, find me and check in for attendance purposes. You will use the library time to engage in research for your annotated bibliography. During the last ten minutes of class, you will show me an article that you printed today.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Noah Shachtman article, "Attack of the Drones," print it and bring a copy to class on Wednesday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    W 9-28  TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of Shachtman article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Kim Stanley Robinson article, "Taming the Red Planet," print it and bring a copy to class on Friday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    F 9-30:
    TODAY'S CLASS:  Peer revision workshop for annotated bibliography.   Your draft must consist of a minimum of 6 entries (citations and corresponding annotations) in proper MLA format; the annotations must be complete, meaning 100 to 150 words each. Bring several extra copies for peer revision. Final turn-in due date is two weeks from today.  In class writing on annotations; discussion of Robinson article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation. Short discussion of Manion and Goodrum article from your Speculations book.

  • Homework:
  • Read Manion and Goodrum in your Speculations book and be prepared for a class discussion on Monday.


    WEEK SEVEN:

    M 10-3  TODAY'S CLASS:  Discussion of Manion and Goodrum article.

  • Homework:
  • RR 4 on Manion and Goodrum.

    W 10-5 TODAY'S CLASS:  RR 4 on Manion and Goodrum due.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Spencer Reiss article, "The Dotcom King & the Rooftop Solar Revolution" print it and bring a copy to class on Friday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    F 10-7:
    TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of the Reiss article.


    WEEK EIGHT:

    M 10-10 TODAY'S CLASS: Bring to class today all materials you will need for time devoted to in-class writing on your annotated bibliography.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Josh McHugh article, "Attention, Shoppers: You Can Now Speed Straight Through Checkout Lines!" print it and bring a copy to class on Wednesday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    W 10-12 TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of McHugh article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

  • Homework:
  • Go to my website and access English Discourse in Research, the e-journal; choose Volume 3, 2005; choose Number 2, April, print the Corey Else article, "The Real Deal: Ideology on Technologies Impact of the Future of Real Estate," and bring it to Friday's class. Considering that your Annotated Bibliography is due on Friday, you do not have to read the Corey Else article beforehand.

    F 10-14: TODAY'S CLASS Annotated Bibliography due. Bring to class today the Project 3 Guidelines; discussion of Bibliographic Analysis Essay; make certain to have the Corey Else article with you for today's class.




    WEEK NINE:

    M 10-17 FALL BREAK 


    W 10-19 TODAY'S CLASS: Debates: Team 1 vs. Team 2

    F 10-21:TODAY'S CLASS: Debates: Team 3 vs. Team 4

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Josh McHugh article, "The Xbox Reloaded," print it and bring a copy to class on Monday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article. Also, read pp. 396-400 in Writing Worth Reading, which covers the subject headings "The Bibliographical Analysis: A Particular Kind of Report," and "Parting Shots," and be prepared for a class discussion of those pages.


    WEEK TEN:

    M 10-24:TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of pp. 396-400 in Writing Worth Reading, as well as the McHugh article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation. Today I will assign the dates for your Individual Presentation Project.

    W 10-26:TODAY'S CLASS: Peer Revision Workshop for Bibliographical Analysis Essay, four full pages minimum, bring several copies. Also bring to class today at least two of your articles; 20 minute in-class writing on Bibliographical Analysis Essay; discussion of Bibliographical Analysis Essay questions/concerns.

    F 10-28:TODAY'S CLASS: Today we will watch a video from the History Channel series, UFO Files, UFOs Then and Now? Cause for Alarm. The video runs about 45 minutes, so we will discuss it on Monday along with the Shachtman article, "Spycam Force." On Monday, turn in discussion questions/observations for both the Shachtman article and the UFO video.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the Noah Shachtman article, "Spycam Force," print it and bring a copy to class on Monday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.


    WEEK ELEVEN:

    M 10-31 TODAY'S CLASS:  Discussion of Shachtman article and UFO video. Make certain to bring a Discussion Question/Observation for both the UFO video and the Shachtman article.

  • Homework:
  • Click here read the John Hockenberry article, "The Blogs of War," print it and bring a copy to class on Wednesday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.

    W 11-2 TODAY'S CLASS: Discussion of Hockenberry article. Make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

    F 11-4  TODAY'S CLASS:   Bibliographical Analysis Essay due. 40 minute prewriting on Moveable Bridge Essay; group discussion of prewriting. These in-class activities will give you a quick-start on the next two major projects, and foster peer feedback. Click here, print the guidelines for the Moveable Bridge Essay, and bring it to class today; discussion of Moveable Bridge Essay. 


    WEEK TWELVE:

    M 11-7 TODAY'S CLASSIndividual Project Presentations.

    W 11-9 TODAY'S CLASS:  Peer Revision Workshop, three full pages minimum, bring several copies. In class writing on Moveable Bridge Essay; Individual Project Presentations.


    F 11-11:TODAY'S CLASS: Individual Project Presentations, or In-class writing on Moveable Bridge Essay. Bring all the materials you will need to work during class. If necessary, some class time will be devoted to finishing Individual Project Presentations. Last day to drop a course (grade of "W")--drop by petition only after this date. Last day to withdraw from all courses with an automatic "W"

  • Homework:
  • I will announce during class if we will do this homework assignment, or if instead we will continue with Individual Project Presentations. Click here read the James Cameron article "The Drive to Discover," print it and bring a copy to class on Monday, along with your Discussion Question/Observation which you will turn in. Essentially, be prepared for a class discussion of the article.


    WEEK THIRTEEN:

    M 11-14 TODAY'S CLASSIndividual Project Presentations, or discussion of Cameron article, in which case you should make certain to bring your Discussion Question/Observation.

    W 11-16 TODAY'S CLASSIndividual Project Presentations, or In-class writing on Moveable Bridge Essay, in which case you should bring all the materials you will need to work during class.

    F 11-18:TODAY'S CLASS Moveable Bridge Essay due. Click here, print the Essay 4 Guidelines and bring them to class today; discussion of Essay 4 assignment.

  • Homework:
  • Read pp. 141-155 in Writing Worth Reading, and be prepared for a class discussion on Monday.


    WEEK FOURTEEN:

    M 11-21 TODAY'S CLASS:  Discussion of pp. 141-155 in Writing Worth Reading; In-class writing on Essay 4. Bring all the materials you will need to work during class.

    W 11-23 TODAY'S CLASS: In-class writing on Essay 4. Bring all the materials you will need to work during class.

    F 11-25:THANKSGIVING BREAK NO CLASS


    WEEK FIFTEEN:

    M 11-28 TODAY'S CLASS:  In-class writing on Essay 4. Bring all the materials you will need to work during class.

    W 11-30:
    TODAY'S CLASS: In-class writing on Essay 4. Bring all the materials you will need to work during class.

    F 12-2  TODAY'S CLASS Essay 4 due. THIS IS THE FINAL DAY TO HAND IN ALL COURSE WORK! NO EXCEPTIONS, REGARDLESS OF CIRCUMSTANCES!
    Friday, 12/2 is the last day to withdraw from all courses with assigned grades of W or F  We review for final examination and I will distribute a study sheet.


    WEEK SIXTEEN: (Pre-Finals Week)

    M 12-5 TODAY'S CLASS:  We watch the first half of a film.

    W 12-7 TODAY'S CLASS:  We finish watching the film.

    F 12-9:
    TODAY'S CLASS: Continued review for final examination.


    WEEK SEVENTEEN: (Finals Week)
    Final examination date and time:
  • 9:30 Class (1213-006): Wednesday, 12/14/05, 8:00 a.m. to 9:50 a.m., Morrill Hall, Room 212.
  • 12:30 Class (1213-010): Wednesday, 12/14/05, 10:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m., Gunderson, Room 105.
  • 1:30 Class (1213-011): Friday, 12/16/05, 2:00 p.m. to 3:50 p.m., Morrill Hall, Room 212.
  •  December 20, Tuesday, Grades due from faculty.


  • COMPOSITION PROGRAM POLICIES Fall 2005

    Contact Information
    Composition Website Address: comp.okstate.edu
    Program Directors: Dr. Richard Frohock (Morrill 409) and Dr. Ron Brooks (Morrill 407A)

    Add/Drop Information

    The last day to add or drop a course without the instructor's signature is 8/29. You may add with the signature of the instructor until 9/2. Only the instructor can sign your add card, so give yourself sufficient time to find the instructor prior to the deadline. The instructor is not required to allow you late entry into the course, nor does his or her signature guarantee you a seat. Composition courses are never over-enrolled, nor are seats held for individuals. The last day to drop a course with a grade of "W" is 11/11. The last date to withdraw from all courses with a "W" or "F" is 12/2. For more information, see http://www.okstate.edu/registrar/AcademicCalendarFall.html

    Students with Disabilities

    If you believe you have a disability that may affect your performance in the course, have Student Disability Services (315 Student Union) contact your instructor to request appropriate accommodations.

    Attendance

    You are expected to be present every day your class meets, but we do allow a specific number of absences without penalty. Absences beyond the limit are considered excessive and result in grade reductions. The only absences that do not count toward the total allowed are those taken for mandatory military service and activities required for classes or scholarships. No other absences will be considered "excused," including absences due to illnesses, doctor's appointments, and emergencies. Reductions will be taken on a percentage basis from the total number of points possible in the course. Students are expected to arrive in class on time in order to be counted present. Requests for exemption from this policy must be made in writing to the Program Director. Two exemptions have been granted since 1999.

    Tues/ Thurs or Mon/ Wed classes: 4 absences without automatic grade reduction, 5 absences = a final grade reduction of 7.5% of the total points possible for the course, 6 absences = a final grade reduction of 15%, and 7 or more absences = failure of the course.

    Mon/Wed/Fri classes: 6 absences without automatic grade reduction, 7 absences = a final grade reduction of 5%, 8 absences = a final grade reduction of 10%, 9 absences = a final grade reduction of 15%, and 10 or more absences = failure of the course.

    Missed in-class work

    Students absent for university-sponsored activities (which do not include social or Greek-sponsored activities, clubs, or intramural athletics) or mandatory military service may make up work missed due to such absence. Other policies regarding missed in-class work are at the discretion of the instructor.

    Late work

    Grades of work defined as "late" (coming in after established due date and time) will be reduced by 5% of the total points possible for the assignment each day it is late. Instructors may determine if this policy includes drafts and how weekends will be counted toward the grade reduction. Instructors may reduce the grade on a paper by up to 5% if a conference or peer editing session is missed.

    Missing work

    You must complete all required drafts and all final copies of the four major papers in order to receive credit for the course.

    Plagiarism

    According to University Policy, plagiarism is "The representation of someone else's ideas as if they are one's own. Where the arguments, data, designs, etc., of someone else are being used in a paper, report, oral presentation, or similar academic project, this fact must be made explicitly clear by citing the appropriate references. The references must fully indicate the extent to which any parts of the project are not one's own work." Plagiarism can result in failure of the course or expulsion from the University. For more information, see the policies listed at comp.okstate.edu.